Categories
Fine Art

16th Annual Exhibition

Don’t miss it!

Categories
Fine Art

EXHIBITION

Announcing: The Anna Lovely Gallery

OPEN EXHIBITION 2022

All welcome!

100 Artists | 100 Artworks

For nine days starting today, Friday 2nd September, the show will run.

Last year, for the first time, I submitted an entry – and won best in category.

This year my entry is:

The Queen And Two Princesses

About the piece:

A composed photograph of Holy Trinity SE20, a church building in Penge, London was abstracted in Photoshop. An award-winning laboratory in Scotland made the image photometallic and added a 6mm acrylic facemount – an absolute essential – effectively doubling the visual quality.

This is luxury art.

https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/177212604/posts/1612

Categories
Music

In Search Of The 32

Ludwig van Beethoven.

Beethoven’s thirty-two piano sonatas have been called, by a few, the New Testament of solo keyboard music; J.S. Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier, the Old Testament.

Book 1

Let’s get to the matter of the topic: performance. For over thirty years I have been listening to recordings of the 32. Within the music, and between the notes, are essences of Beethoven and his classical/romantic world. Beethoven’s family and family life, and educational development; his forebears and teachers; his own established life as a pianist and composer; antiquity and culture of his time; his muse and acquaintances; even war and politics of his era — all made the man: Beethoven.

Book 2

Beethoven’s early solo keyboard sonatas were written to be played on harpsichord or fortepiano — this includes sonata no. 8, op. 13 named grand sonate  pathétique by the publisher. In my opinion this is because of the soothing, gentle, rocking and emotionally atmospheric elements of the second movement. As harpsichords do not have a sustain pedal, I have played this particular music without pedal — and, to my delight and wonder, it is more poetic. All my sheet music scores shows pedal.

Several years ago I went to Robert Morley & Company based in Lewisham, London looking for a piano. I had a collection of scores as test pieces. Piano after piano were left wanting. And so I took a leap: I tried a piano out of my bracket. It was Beethoven; I heard Beethoven! The piano was a British made Broadwood. Needless to say, Broadwood gave one of their pianos to Beethoven. Could the truth of the 32 be heard in a Broadwood?

Earlier today I received a subscribed email that linked to an article on the thirty-two sonatas. All extracts played on pianofortes. All eminent pianists or musicians with fine interpretations. All Beethoven…?

Michael Bobb – Artist • Author • Occasional Composer

Friday 26th August 2022

This recording includes Sonate Pathétique — without pedal. It is played on an Elysian piano, not a Broadwood. Listen for the poetry… and enjoy the poem!

Categories
Poetry

Elizabeth Windsor

Amen, we say, God bless you, ma’am

Reigning on the throne 70 a yarn

Serving steadfast and steady, and so calm

Our queen has made the record book

All eyes to her this day will look

Celebrate our world-class monarch

Head of the Commonwealth lands

Sovereign of the Garter, and

Supreme Governor of the Church of England

750 holiday cards issued every year

1,500 puddings to employees far and near

Philanthropic activity beyond compare

Her first corgi was called Susan by name

A lover of horses and the equine game

And owns unmarked mute swans on the Thames

Her Royal Highness and Majesty

Is also a lover of photography

And taking pictures of her family

To Scottish dancing she is partial

Hosting balls at Balmoral Castle

And Highland cuisine as traditional

Christmas message broadcast on the day

Telegram message on your 100th birthday

And media message honouring citizens – hooray!

Serving steadfast and steady, and so calm

Reigning on the throne 70 a yarn

Amen, we say, God bless you, ma’am!

Categories
Uncategorised

‘The Johann Sebastian Bach Limericks’

Music Maestro!

Four short poems about J. S. Bach’s music.

Limerick 1

An ecclesiastical cycle.

J. S. Bach’s Church Cantata oeuvre

Is really quite pious and pure

The melodies are holy

And so are the harmonies

For 3 liturgical calendars, not 4”

So, what is a Cantata? A Cantata is a musical work composed for the voice. It is approximately twenty minutes long with smaller movements for solo voice, chorus and instrumental accompaniment — sometimes all three.

Church Cantatas, aka Sacred Cantatas, are intended to be performed during Christian liturgy.

What is the difference between an Opera and a Cantata? As a Cantata is a vocal work, mainly during the C17th and C18th, an Opera is a theatrical work combining drama, music, song and sometimes dance.

Limerick 2

The Composer’s sewing machine!

Limerick 3

A poem for Count Kaiserling.

Limerick 4

A contemporary instrument of the viola da gamba.

For full-length videos of my poems, see below:

Soaring Higher (videobook)

The Editor’s Cut

18 poems from the paperback

Apple Books:

Categories
music Poetry

“The Known Great Composer”

A few years ago I was online scanning the concert listings at a world-class venue in London. On this particular occasion I was looking for small scale music-making. The Baroque era is a favourite of mine, and I chose a recorder and theorbo programme.

On the day of the concert I was early, and so decided to spend some time in a book shop. Afterwards, I went to the concert hall and started my packed lunch. Before I could finish it was time for the concert to begin.

During the concert sometimes the instruments played together, sometimes they played solo. For one recorder solo, the recordist played two recorders simultaneously! When the theorboist played solo pieces, one of them was introduced as a passacaglia – which, to my amusement, collected philistinic giggles. If only the pictures of musical aristocracy on the walls of the concert room had ears of flesh!

This poem, The Known Great Composer, is about the concert. Head and shoulders above, one composer and his music made my whole time in London memorable. Memorable for the right reason – music.

No prizes, but if you can guess the Great Composer I don’t mention, you are a winner! Clue: Imagine the accompanying music in this clip being played two octaves lower on a solo cello…

First verse

“The Known Great Composer”

“The window blinds close

The stage lights are adjusted

Two musicians walk on stage

And we welcome them warmly…”

On the way home, I happened to see someone I knew. We talked for a while, and I expressed that I would be writing a poem about the concert. By this time, my mind had already begun putting the poem together.

Furthermore, before arriving home, I visited a local art gallery and talked more about poetry to the exhibiting Artist, referencing the couple of books I bought earlier that day written by the Poet Laureate.

Categories
Poetry

This is the Month – Eastertide

This is the month

When they say that it rains and pours

Down come the showers

From heaven’s open doors

But in-between the cascades

There are beams of sunlight 

Shining through clouds

Heavy laden and fluffy white

This is the month

When the daylight grows longer and longer

With the sun rising earlier

And setting later and later

There is also a change

In the quality of light visible in the atmosphere

This phenomenon only happens

Once in the northern hemisphere 

This is the month

When spring is well and truly here 

It’s time for leaping of the lamb

And the young deer

Buds are prising open

Seeds and bulbs germinate

O’ the splendour

Of nature’s natural nascency about this date

This is the month

That brings high tides to our shores

As the moon orbits closer

And waxes more and more

These signs are where

The Jewish people take their Passover

And from where Christians

Take the major holiday called Easter

There is nothing like Eastertide

Celebrating a fantastic event

It happened 2000 years ago

And I, in a sense, was present

The most spectacular display

Of God’s agape love

Crucifixion and Resurrection

The only plan from above

On a Friday God laid sin on His Son

The sin of men nailed to a cross

He crucified the sinless Lamb

And took away our dross

On a Sunday Christ is raised

And we are raised with Him

This same Resurrection Power

— The Spirit — is at work within

And now we can live righteously

The old has gone, the new has come

Spreading the Good News Gospel

Of what Jesus Christ has done

This is the Month (audio)

Categories
Fine Art

Art Exhibition – Revisited

The recent art exhibition at the Anna Lovely Gallery was open for two weeks, ending on the 3rd April 2022. The Artists showing were selected from the 2021 Summer Open Exhibition. On the penultimate day I made footage and added fitting music by Mussorgsky called ‘Pictures at an Exhibition’.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Categories
Music

Music Review

Toccata and Fugue in D minor BWV 565

This is the most famous piece of organ music ever written!

From the very first notes it demands your attention. But, was it really composed by Johann Sebastian Bach? Well, surely everybody knows it was because, after all, that’s how we came to know the piece.

However, a very small ‘however,’ one or two quarters have made remarks about this music that are interesting.

Bombastic, outlandish and downright outrageous?

Sweeping, catchy proverbs after sweeping, catchy proverbs?

And, would maestro Bach ever compose in such a style so different from all his other output?

Answering the first question, my thoughts are that it is extremely flamboyant, debonair and daring.

To answer the second question I would say that, at times I couldn’t bear to hear the piece. It sounds so like the music you would hear when you are put on ‘hold’ on a customer services call. Or even a piece of elevator music. One cannot escape the fact that it is, as the title implies, virtuosic.

And to answer the third question let me say that, all great composers have the ability to write in a wide variety of different styles — the wider the variety, the greater the genius. Whether the quieter nuances or the spicy fireworks, if one can compose without limits, one is unlimited — a master. It is my opinion that Bach probably wrote the Toccata before breakfast. A mere exercise a virtuoso could dash off to dazzle and impress anyone who happens to be within the church’s vicinity.

For this post I will be taking the first movement, the Toccata.

Recordings

Not all recordings are equal.

I have been enthusiastic and passionate about music, particularly the ‘classical’ genre, for my entire adult life, and have come to realise that different recordings of a piece can vary, one to the other — and quite a bit, too.

The piece under the spotlight here was composed for church organ, probably before 1708. There are also arrangements for orchestra, solo violin and the piano. It has been said that the moment a piece of music is re-arranged from its original, it has been re-composed.

I see the piano as the musical instrument of my choice since 1990. An eminent guitarist said a few years ago, “Whilst stringed music is for the emotions, piano music is for the intellect”.  So, join me on this particular musical excursion, on the piano, with Bach’s legendary Toccata.

In my CD library (yes, they do still exist) are four CDs that include recordings of the Toccata on the piano (see below). Over the years I have developed a musical palette whereby I can tell within the first few bars of a recording whether it will be satisfying and pleasurable. If only I had all the ultimate recordings then I could rest! I want all of them — now!

Sheet Music

As you can see below, there are four different publications of the Bach piece in my library – all arranged for solo piano.

These publications, with the help of recordings to an extent, shows one how to play the notes. However, playing the music is an entirely different game – I love affair – making the notes leave the page and into the ears.

Music is to be enjoyed and not endured. Making music is not a mechanical process played by automatron robots, but a dance between musician and listener, between a man and a woman. The heart, the intellect and the spirit of a person are all at play. To me, it is all about communication – two-way communication.

Music is nostalgic — enjoying the past now. Music is predictive — drawing down from tomorrow and enjoying it now. Music is art.

And how does one translate two notes on a page to two notes on the airwaves? Answer: interpretation. What statements are you going to make? What phrasing are you going to articulate? Are there any emphasis you could bring to highlight a point or two? And what is the overall shape, the story you want to tell: the starting point, the endpoint, and the interim?

My Interpretation

And so to my interpretation of the Toccata from Bach’s BWV 565…

Thirty-five years ago since I became aware of the work, I am now hearing it call out to me: “Rubato!” and, “More rubato!” And sometimes I never pay the stolen time back! As I have been familiar with the piece for such a long time, I am instilling more musicality into performances — which, of course, is inseparable from elements of my personality. And so, naturally, I have made recordings – just for fun.

Section 1

The last recording I made brought with it a surprise. Up until that date I had always played the opening with the same notes. But, for the first time it dawned on me to play the same passage with extra notes. I tried it. And, it worked! With these new notes came a new interpretation on how they should sound. In short, there is a deliberate slowing down of the opening, together with increased volume dynamics, and becoming more emphatic as the music descends down the keyboard into the sonorous depths of D minor… And that’s just the opening!

Look out for another exaggerated detachment — this time two notes. And the music continues…

Section 1 video

Section 2

In this section I draw further on my feelings on how poetry should be performed. This is played out with more manipulation of the timings. When, as I tell the story, I repeat a particular chord sequence, the chord sequence anticipates, predicting that something different is about to happen — a new scene, as it were, is just around the corner. This predictive text is not written in the score but comes from my memory of an old recording on audio cassette tape played on a church organ…

Section 2 video

Section 3

Much more rubato and dramatic storytelling…!

Enjoy!

Section 3 video

My own review of my own performance? Stately. Pronounced. Flights into the ether? Faithful to the term ‘toccata’. Organistic. 

Categories
poetry

The Garden of Eden

God created the Garden of Eden

A pure unspoiled paradise

An ordered beautiful landscape

That could grow and increase in size

God placed Adam and Eve in the Garden

And said, “Be fruitful and multiply

Fill the earth and subdue it

And govern all that creep, swim and fly”

In the Garden a love story began

Adam and Eve enjoying flesh-of-my-flesh

The two became an unashamed one

In the first marriage with a world to bless

Adam and Eve experienced the joy of God

His presence with them was unbroken

As strong as a three-stranded cord

That’s how it was in the Paradise Garden

In the Garden was the forbidden tree

That could cause catastrophic strife

In the midst of the Garden, though

Was another tree, the Tree of Life

“In the day that you eat of it you shall surely die”

God plainly said to Adam and Eve

All they had to do was not eat from the forbidden tree

Believe God, Adam and Eve, just believe!

It was the cunning, slippery serpent

That tempted Eve to sin

Adam fell too and their eyes were opened

And the Cosmos became cursed as death entered in

God then drove them out of Eden

And placed a cherubim at the east

And a flaming sword that turned every way

Guarding the Tree of Life and its feast

However, this is not how it all ends

We will not return to the lost Eden

Redemption and Consummation is coming

There’s no plan for that Ancient Garden

In the future will be a Greater Garden

With the Tree of Life on both sides of the River

Its leaves are for the healing of the nations

And the juicy, sweet fruit we will savour

Yes, we will eat from the Tree of Life

Its branches regularly fully laden

Yielding a new crop every month

In the new and Everlasting Eden

The Garden of Eden (audio)